Diversity and inclusion must be business-driven to be successful

By Alyssa Badalamenti, PRSA Diversity and Inclusion Chair

“If enhancing diversity and inclusion is not for the right thing, then do it for the business case,” said Deloria Nelson, President of Authentic Culture & Engagement Solutions.

Nelson consults with Fortune 500 companies on how to better their diversity and inclusion goals by developing customized workforce solutions for their teams. She likes to give company leaders the business case for why engaging diversity and inclusion matters—not just for people, but also for bolstering the company’s productivity, performance, and bottom line.

Once an executive team understands the business case, the Human Resources department typically takes the reins. But it takes more than implementing a new hiring policy to become a company with an inclusive culture.

“Diversity and inclusion in the workplace should be business-driven and integrated in the business culture, not just a standalone HR initiative,” Nelson said. “CEO support and transparency are critical to creating longevity and stickiness in company culture because it drives accountability and credibility.”

Nelson recently spoke to members of the Florida Diversity Council at its May program, sharing plenty of statistics and examples of how engaging in these practices will keep your company at pace with evolving needs for better workplace practices.

“We are living in a political era in which more companies are determining that they need to improve their diversity and inclusion efforts,” she explained. “But it is not political; it is a people thing.”

Nelson says it’s okay to be vulnerable when making decisions in diversity and inclusion engagement, as long you’re sincerely trying.

“Just be willing to take the risk—even if you make missteps along the way,” she advised.

She does, of course, recommend some important guidelines. Keep in mind this advice when evaluating your organization’s diversity and inclusion efforts.

 

Be aware of unconscious bias

Write objective skill sets in job postings and take a deep look at your words, phrases, and sentences that may be biased. Ensure there is a diverse slate of candidates interviewed by a diverse hiring panel. Diversity officers at the company are great, but how can one person define diversity and inclusion? Look at your leaders, too. Notice that representation is typically minimized as you move up in leadership positions. Be sure to give adequate support, tools, and resources equally for deserving individuals to progress at the company.

 

Be careful with “culture fit”

What does your office culture really mean? In our minds, we struggle with reconciling a new image of an old position. Be careful with “culture fit”—culture should evolve to let more people in it. Instead of looking for a “culture fit,” look for a “culture add,” or a candidate who will bring diverse opinions and experiences to the company’s culture.

 

Set goals and be humble

Balance strategy and tactics to keep people engaged. Be strategic, but don’t be so strategic that no one knows what you’re doing. Ensure you provide transparency, have CEO support, and have a “champion.” There’s no one way to do it right, but any movements, even baby steps, will take you in the right direction. But don’t toot your horn just because you’re better than you were before. The goal should be forward improvement, not to compare to others, or to compare to your lack of progress in the past.

 

Be yourself and learn from others

Don’t wear a mask! Think about how much energy it takes to be someone else at work just to fit in. And on the other side, learn from others. Don’t say things about someone’s culture without actually getting to know someone in the culture. Remember that we have more in common than we have differences. With proper relationships, you can avoid a diversity and inclusion crisis. When you prioritize inclusion, diversity will happen naturally because people enjoy working where they feel included.

 

Why isn’t it working?

If your company culture has not changed after implementing new practices, understand why. Nelson says it’s typically because of one or more of the following factors: fear of change, privilege, traditions, culture fit, loss of culture, or “sacred cows”—an idea or custom held (unreasonably) because it’s been ingrained in the company for a long time. There are often psychological and system barriers in place that can hurt behavioral change. Don’t be afraid of removing them.

 

One thing you can do immediately is make it mandatory to diversify candidate slates.

“It’s just like online dating,” Nelson explained. “When you open your scope of exposure, you open your culture to diversity.”

The Florida Diversity Council is a nonprofit organization that serves as a resource for diversity best practices and leadership development in Florida. The May program was part of a monthly series of events with the goal to influence leaders in the Central Florida community on what it truly means to engage diversity within company leadership.

PRSA Orlando’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee attended the program to be able to share key takeaways with chapter members, and learn how to incorporate Nelson’s advice within the public relations industry.

Things to consider when recruiting PR talent from diverse backgrounds

By Tyrone Law, PRSA Diversity & Inclusion Committee Member

Not long ago, in an effort to elevate my career to the next level, I shifted into “job search mode” and my quest to step into a new public relations role began. After several interviews, I began to more deeply contemplate the notion that I’d only be willing to take my PR talents to an organization that embraced diversity in a dynamic way—a company whose senior leadership truly reflected diversity and inclusion.

According to a recent survey by Glassdoor, 67% of job seekers say that when evaluating companies and job offers, it is important to them that the company has a diverse workforce, and when it comes to leadership diversity, the survey showed that two in five people do not think their company has a diverse executive team. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the ethnic makeup of the PR industry in the U.S. is 78% Caucasian, 17% Hispanic American, 13% African-American and 6% Asian-American.

In 2019, it’s easier than ever for jobseekers to log into sites like LinkedIn and Facebook to absorb firsthand what a company’s current workforce looks like. Future talent also can effortlessly see right through companies or organizations that merely go through the “diversity and inclusion checkbox” while failing to staff a truly diverse workforce or leadership team. You know those companies that claim they “champion diversity and inclusion” because it’s all over their website, but show very little concrete evidence in support of that statement.

Staffing your top-level PR positions with a diverse mix of talent representing a multitude of different cultures, disciplines, ideals, gender, disabilities and sexual orientations, fosters campaigns that truly reflect the society in which we live. Unique perspective is invaluable. A study from global management firm Boston Consulting Group found that “increasing the diversity of leadership teams leads to more and better innovation and improved financial performance.”

Get out of your comfort zone and engage diverse communities

Collaborating with local organizations that support communities underrepresented in the PR industry, recruiting talent from Historically Black Colleges and Universities and networking with organizations made up of professionals with disabilities are great examples of ways companies can step out of their typical recruiting tactics and engage talent in new communities.

The PR industry certainly isn’t the worst industry in its diversity and inclusion efforts, but there are still many strides that must be made towards representation and inclusion. Recruiting diverse PR talent isn’t just a matter of morality, it affects a company’s bottom-line and evolves with the changing demographics of our audiences.

Engaging the unengaged: Focusing on minority audiences in the tourism industry

By Veronica Figueroa Fernandez, PRSA Diversity & Inclusion Committee 

Our need for exploring and adventure connects us as people, allowing us to create lasting memories. And while traveling can be stressful at times, for persons with disabilities the challenges can often feel overwhelming.

According to The World Bank, one billion people, or 15% of the world’s population, experience some form of disability. One-fifth of the estimated global total, or between 110 million and 190 million people, experience significant disabilities.

With an awareness that understanding the needs of disabled persons can result in increased visitation, Experience Kissimmee (Osceola County’s tourism authority) is leading the charge locally in promoting diversity and inclusion in their marketing and public relations efforts.

Recently, Experience Kissimmee partnered with leading accessible travel blogger Cory Lee (pictured above) from CurbFreeWithCoryLee.com, where he visited the destination and shared wheelchair accessible activities in Kissimmee–from soaring over alligators at Gatorland to exploring the town of Celebration.

Cori Powers, director of communications at Experience Kissimmee, shared with us why diversity and inclusion are crucial to the travel and hospitality industry.

Why is it important for Experience Kissimmee to promote accessible tourism?

As a destination, we promise a vacation where sunny hellos, out-of-this-world adventures, and wow-worthy experiences are always included. That promise pertains to everyone. Part of Kissimmee’s appeal is its accessibility. We put the focus on fun, so that accommodations, transportation, and access is as worry-free as possible. It’s important our messaging promotes that in Kissimmee, the entire family, no matter age, race, style, or culture, stay and play together.

Why should diversity and inclusion matter to the travel and hospitality industry?

The travel and hospitality industry needs to be representative of the population it serves. As buying power shifts, the industry needs to work to acknowledge and pivot messaging and communications efforts to fit individual audiences and needs.

How else is Experience Kissimmee featuring diversity and inclusion in their public relations efforts?

Whether we are talking to consumers, groups, event planners, event rights holders, or travel agents, our messaging is that Kissimmee is accessible. We work to educate different audiences that all are welcome here. We achieve this by promoting our partners and events that share our focus on inclusion and diversity, making it easy for us to tell that story.

As you already know, we hosted blogger and disabled traveler Cory Lee in Kissimmee. At Gatorland, he was able to zipline 350 feet through the air right over the Alligator Breeding Marsh on the Gator Gauntlet. We’ve also worked with LGBTQ influencers such as Perez Hilton, distributed a press release touting Kissimmee’s autism-friendly attractions and accommodations, and constantly showcase our hotels and vacation homes’ ability to accommodate any special needs.

We also have established local events that help promote our destination as inclusive and diverse. Experience Kissimmee sponsors PrideFest Kissimmee in June, a celebration grounded in welcoming and acknowledging the impactful contributions of our local LGBTQ community. Our area celebrates diversity through many multicultural events, such as the Caribbean Fusion Festival and the Cuban Sandwich Festival.

As public relations professionals, we need to engage a focus on minority audiences to make them our regular audience because ultimately, diversity and inclusion is something that all customers, including discerning travelers, notice and value.

Silence is not golden when there is an expectation of caring

By Alyssa Badalamenti, PRSA Orlando Diversity and Inclusion Chair

When you don’t respond to something within a crisis, your silence makes it seem like you don’t care.

We know this specifically as public relations professionals because this is PR Crisis 101.

When a large mistake is made within your company and it affects people negatively, people expect a company response to show you care.

When a tragedy happens within the public, people expect (or at least appreciate) a company response to show you care.

If you don’t publicly recognize that you do care about diversity and inclusion, your silence will make it seem like you don’t care.

What would reasonable people appropriately expect a responsible organization to do in this situation?

Big brands responding to a lack of diversity and inclusion in recent years has created a shift and an expectation for all companies to step up. Each of your stakeholders in the case of diversity expects you to publicly address it as part of your company values.

Will silence be seen as indifference?

Calling out that you’re supportive of actionable policies and positive changes made to address diversity and inclusion is the expectation. If you’re not part of this message, it could be perceived that your company is indifferent to it.

Will those who matter to us expect us to do or say something?

It’s become equally as important to the public as it is to employees and stakeholder groups that you are using good workplace practices and taking steps to make everyone feel included and recognized.

And minority group or not, your most loyal and active audience expects you to be on top of diversity and inclusion. With appropriate diversity and inclusion messaging, even a latent public can become closer to your brand, which is good for business too.

If we wait to respond, do we lose the ability to influence the outcome?

You know the saying, “Now is already too late.” And chances are you’re already behind on this effort.

But in this case, it’s never too late to take a stance publicly because your audience expects your efforts to constantly evolve.

This isn’t a “set it and forget it” message.  Diversity and inclusion messaging should continue as long as you expect your company to thrive.

Give diversity and inclusion the time it’s worth by making company efforts more dynamic, then communicate the message that you do care loudly and often. Your audience expects it.

Diversity Blog: Our Numbers Do Not Decrease Our Impact

Authored by Mimi Flatley, APR, Co-VP of Accreditation

A few years ago, a colleague and I spoke during a university communications class about how we started in our respective careers. We began by asking the soon-to-be grads where they hoped to work after college: For a sports team, at a large health care organization, in the hospitality industry, for a leading tech company, and so on. I wasn’t surprised that not one answer was the industry I’ve spent the past decade working in—the industry that builds the stadiums, hospitals, theme parks and offices these students hoped to work in—construction.

Communications in the construction industry was not on my radar after college. But there is no place I’d rather be. While the numbers aren’t that impressive – women make up less than 9 percent of the construction workforce according to the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) – the women I work with truly shine.

Companies who “get it” address the gaps and offer ways to support diverse groups. At Turner Construction, for example, our Women Impacting Turner (WIT) employee resource group serves as a support system in the company to foster awareness, respect and inclusion. Turner Orlando’s WIT group includes a roster of more than 50 employees with a mission to work as a diverse team to build knowledge of business and leadership skills, and empower each other to develop and maintain work environments that recognize and cultivate a culture of diversity.

Each year during NAWIC’s Women in Construction Week, the group organizes professional development, community outreach, and networking events to highlight women in our industry. This helps empower women in construction. Just this past week, the group attended jobsite tours hosted by female project managers, attended safety classes, and highlighted the success of tradeswomen, an even smaller percentage of the construction workforce (3 percent).

As a communications professional, I’m glad the numbers don’t scare me. In my role today, I’m surrounded by engineers, safety managers, superintendents, and project managers – women – who are building the future. When women support each other, our numbers do not decrease our impact.

What we learned at supper: PRSA members on diversity and inclusion

Authored by Alyssa Badalamenti, Diversity & Inclusion Chair for the PRSA Orlando chapter

The PRSA Orlando chapter recently selected 12 members of diverse backgrounds to participate in an open discussion on diversity and inclusion. During the first-time experimental event, Dinner, Diversity, and Dialogue provided an opportunity for sharing personal experiences followed by a focused brainstorm on ways to support PRSA members at their organizations and extend the chapter’s diversity and inclusion initiatives.

The participants ranged from a diverse demographic makeup of varied genders, races, religions, orientations, ages, experience levels and industries. We also engaged a facilitator, Bill Hertan, to guide our conversation. He brought with him 30 years of experience in leadership and organizational development. He has lead diversity and inclusion efforts at several Fortune 500 companies and runs his own consultancy.

We immediately heard comments such as, “I’ve been waiting for something like this,” and, “I’m so glad PRSA Orlando is stepping up to the plate to directly address diversity.”

We learned that diversity and inclusion guidelines could help members when they face challenges within their own organizations, and members could use support from PRSA by creating its own best practices.

But what does a diversity and inclusion model look like?

One idea was to mimic the PRSA Code of Ethics model and co-produce guidelines with other associations, specifically with human resource management groups. PRSA National has also created a Diversity and Inclusion toolkit for chapters to use to increase diversity and inclusion within their membership. This toolkit could serve as a starting point for organizations to create their own diversity and inclusion model.

While there are not yet structured diversity and inclusion policies for communications professionals like there are for ethics, diversity and inclusion starts with intentional workplace practices. There are common themes and insights that can be used to benchmark progress. For example, we learned that simply acknowledging how our chapter embraces diversity and how we aspire to improve our efforts resulted in positive feedback and discussion. Companies that endeavor to address the issue will also experience deepened morale.

Below are some key takeaways from our discussion at supper:

 

INITIAL THOUGHTS

  • Talk about it, talk about it, TALK ABOUT IT.
    • Never stop talking about ways to advance diversity and inclusion.
  • “When I walk into a room, there’s nobody that looks like me.”
    • Look around the table. Representation matters.
  • It’s not just a box to check.
    • It’s important to walk the walk, not just talk the talk.

 

FROM THEN TO NOW

  •  BACK THEN: Leave yourself outside of the door when you go to work.
    • “I remember being told, ‘Don’t tell anyone in business because you’ll never work the same way again.’”
  • TODAY: Bring your full self to work.
    • “I came out at work by simply putting a photo of my family at my desk.”

 

HOW DOES DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION AFFECT OUR COMMUNICATION?

  • Experiences define our world view.
    • Our unique experiences shape how we communicate.
  • Lead by example.
    • We tend to look toward large organizations to lead the way in how we communicate to diverse audiences. Calling out prejudice is important, even if the company is not directly involved.
  • Learn from mistakes.
    • We also learn from other companies’ mistakes regarding diversity. Inaction can be perceived just as negatively as being tone-deaf.
  • Executive involvement is important.
    • Your level at the company typically affects your comfort level of addressing bias.

 

IT STARTS AT THE HR LEVEL

  • Hire leaders who “get it.”
    • Hire leaders who promote an environment of “being yourself.”
  • Write it in the job description.
    • Emphasize the importance of diversity and inclusion in job descriptions.
  • Set the tone.
    • Highlight the business case for expanding diversity and inclusion goals.
  • Is it apparent in the company culture?
    • Embed diversity and inclusion in the company culture in specific ways.
  • Measure against goals.
    • Could accountable actions as part of the employee review process help advance diversity and inclusion?

 

WHAT COMPANIES CAN DO FROM THE GET-GO:

  • Acknowledge: Acknowledging that you want to improve diversity and inclusion in your organization speaks loudly.
  • Communicate: Proper communication is the cornerstone of addressing diversity head-on.
  • Represent: Provide visual representation of diversity in photos that convey a message of inclusion.
  • Guide: Provide solid tools and guidelines of diversity and inclusion within your branding and strategy.

 

THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF EQUALITY

  • Intent is not equal to development.
    • The recent example of Starbucks holding an employee diversity training day to address racial bias seemed like a “quick fix” attempt instead of providing a deeper development of its company culture.
  • Not everyone feels comfortable talking about it.
    • It’s wise to incorporate anonymous surveys to make sure everyone has a voice.
  • AND, it doesn’t always need to be talked about.
    • Making comments about differences, over-correcting, or including someone just to “check the box” can actually make that person feel less included or singled out.
  • It takes more than one person.
    • Just having a “Diversity and Inclusion Leader” is not enough. One person cannot represent an entire group.

 

CONSENSUS

 At the very least, the consensus was that the public relations profession can promote the importance of diversity and inclusion within agencies, corporations and with clients through strategic counsel, communications and recruiting.

Companies should start by implementing or revamping diversity and inclusion policies. It’s equally important to hire diverse talent that reflects their audiences to better understand unique cultural perspectives.

By embedding diversity and inclusion within company culture, incorporating good workplace practices, and having a team that represents diverse individuals, companies can better relate to their audiences, avoid tone-deaf mistakes, and enhance their business.

We look forward to hearing more from you about how PRSA can help communications professionals address diversity and inclusion in the profession and at large. We welcome suggestions from all of our members. Please reach out to PRSA Orlando’s Diversity and Inclusion Chair, Alyssa Badalamenti, to continue the discussion and provide feedback.

Recap on what happened at the Best of #PRdiversity Twitter chat

by Alyssa Badalamenti, PRSA Diversity and Inclusion Chair

@PRSAOrlando, your chapter implemented a consistent diversity and inclusion blog that addresses timely topics, but also isn’t afraid to rid formality – share top lessons learned?

     PRSA Orlando: We heard feedback from our members that it was refreshing to hear our chapter address #PRdiversity topics in a casual way – just like we were talking at lunch — rather than a formal “by the book” approach. We learned that being direct in addressing #PRdiversity topics allowed opportunity for more focused discussion with our members. This inspired us to create a new event called Dinner, Diversity & Dialogue to continue those conversations.

Making diversity and inclusion part of the business strategy should be a top priority for all @PRSA @PRSSANational chapters for #PRdiversity to be effective. @PRSAOrlando, last calendar year, your chapter reinstated a Diversity & Inclusion Chair, one you hadn’t had for some time – what led to the reinstatement & what are lessons learned?

     PRSA Orlando: Orlando has always been a melting pot, especially because of our welcoming tourism. When the Pulse nightclub tragedy occurred in 2016, all of us in the Orlando community become a voice to remind each other and others how Orlando is proud to be diverse and inclusive. As Orlando strongly united as #OnePulse, the PRSA Orlando chapter BOD unanimously approved the re-establishment of a D&I Chair. #PRdiversity has become a focus for all members of the board – and something we expect to build on indefinitely.

You’ve been named an award-winning @PRSA chapter in 2018 for #PRdiversity – what are you most proud of looking back at the year when it comes to championing diversity & inclusion in our practice?

     PRSA Orlando: We are most proud of our members. We have given our members more of a voice through our initiatives, and are still learning and identifying approaches to be more effective. Check out some of our member quotes on what #PRdiversity means to them: https://prsaorlando.org/diversity-inclusion/

Following up on the last question, looking ahead to 2019, what are your plans/goals for #PRdiversity within your chapter?  Or in general for @PRSA @PRSSANational?

     PRSA Orlando: We plan to take our findings from #PRdiversity discussions and programs to produce a white paper addressing what D&I looks like to our members. We also plan on partnering with other great associations to create some best practices for public relations professionals.

As we wrap up our final #PRdiversity Twitter Chat for 2018, we’ll ask for any closing thoughts from our guests?

     PRSA Orlando: Don’t be afraid to address what you consider as taboo – just TALK about it! Ask questions to learn, discuss to consider, and take action to create positive change. Thank you @PRSAdiversity for honoring us with an award for our chapter efforts in diversity and inclusion this year. We look forward to learning more from @PRSANational and other chapters to make a continuing impact.

Follow us at @PRSAOrlando and follow #PRdiversity and @PRSADiversity to read more.

Effectively reach key messages to audiences of all ages in a multimedia generation

By Alyssa Badalamenti, PRSA Diversity and Inclusion Chair

By now, everyone has replaced ‘millennials’ with ‘Gen X’ in their editorials, and millennials are looped in with the previous generations who grew into having negative stereotypes of the newest generation. Why is it that with every generation we get into this cycle of comparing habits and perceiving them to be negative? Why does it have to be this way? Often, I hear it’s because “they don’t understand.” As communicators, it’s our job to understand our audience, but how can we communicate properly if we don’t shape our messages for a diverse audience? Rather than writing the same way we always have because it makes sense to us, we could instead seek input from generations outside our own. How we work, communicate, and consume is different among generations. By understanding why we have differences and what they are, we can communicate more effectively to our audiences.

Take a look at this chart taken from Dr. Susan MacManus’ editorial column, “Shining the Spotlight on Florida’s Youngest Registered Voters: A Generational Approach.” In her column, Dr. MacManus writes, “Each generation is different demographically and in its exposure to various major economic, social, technological, and political events that can impact vote decisions.” Each generation has had its own shaped opinions based on major life events and the presidential office held. Each life event also holds different weight in terms of importance. Add on differences in race, gender, religion, etc…it’s no wonder why we often hear that “they just don’t understand.”

Jennifer J. Deal, a research scientist with the Center for Creative Leadership, argues that the generations now of working age value essentially the same things as older generations.  “The so-called generation gap is, in large part, the result of miscommunication and misunderstanding, fueled by common insecurities and the desire for clout,” she says.  It’s easy to understand that each generation has had different experiences and thus probably has a unique perspective to communications and how they represent their work and their organizations. And naturally through the growth of resources, technology and transparency, public relations is going through its own generational growth. However, public relations has essentially stayed the same in its core values and foundation of key messages. Public relations practitioners in any generation could benefit by understanding generational differences and seeing the value in working as part of a multigenerational team. We just need to ask the right questions.

By working with multigenerational teams, we can more effectively communicate by seeking input on how key messages come across to different generations.  According to the Pew Research Center, there was a drop in media viewership from the last calendar year across most modes (newspaper, cable/network/local television, and digital-native news), with the exception of radio and social media. Communicators have always needed to be aware of how their audiences consume media and adapt to the changing trends; this is true for any generation.  Communicators can be successful by understanding how each generation consumes media, and by using a variety of communication types to reach their target audience. Example: “Check it out” versus “You may find the video below;” It’s especially important for internal communicators when talking to employees of diverse age groups. Communicators would benefit from studying and/or talking to generations different than their own to ensure key messages reflect the audiences being communicated to. Just remember, one way of communication is not better than the other; they’re just different approaches to relaying the same key message to an audience that understands it better.

August is PRSA Diversity & Inclusion Month

By Alyssa Badalamenti, PRSA Diversity and Inclusion Chair

PRSA recognizes August as its Diversity and Inclusion month, a time to focus the spotlight on advancing the profession through representation of the hardworking communications professionals of diverse backgrounds and thought.

Throughout the last couple of months, we’ve asked our members to share with us what diversity and inclusion means to them. Through these messages, we’ve been able to gain a better understanding of how our chapter defines diversity and inclusion. Check out our Twitter and Facebook as we share more quotes this month and in the long-term so that we can continue to shape what diversity and inclusion means to the PR profession.

PRSA’s National Diversity and Inclusion Committee has also been working diligently to advance the diversity discussion through industry events, mixers, awards and more. The PRSA Orlando chapter has followed suit. We will continue to work toward making diversity and inclusion a yearlong recognition by increasing the visibility of our members and providing best practices and resources to advance diversity in all levels of the profession.

Do you have a quote to share? Send an email to Alyssa Badalamenti on what diversity and inclusion means to you.

Diversity Should Be Celebrated All Year Long

By Alyssa Badalamenti, Diversity & Inclusion Chair

June 12 marked two years since the Pulse nightclub tragedy in Orlando. 49 beautiful lives were taken senselessly. Through the heartbreak, our city has since become more unified in its strong voice for diversity and inclusion because of who we are and who we represent. But when remembering this tragic incident and many others along the way, it’s hard not to be reminded of how much hate still exists in the world.

“Ultimately, America’s answer to the intolerant man is diversity.” – Robert Kennedy

That being said, while we can’t raise a magic wand this minute, we can do our part to build a greater immunity to hate and be more representative of diversity by deliberately being inclusive within our companies, our associations, and our own daily lives.

Just check out this list of 26 companies who celebrate diversity all year long. These companies are LIVING their differences, not just preaching it. Embracing all types of people, ridding the norms, and seeing a good person as a good person are what help shape D&I for all members of society.

“Our ability to reach unity in diversity will be the beauty and test of our civilization.” – Mahatma Gandhi

Recently our PRSA Orlando chapter board of directors decided we wanted to make a statement to our members that reflects our chapter on diversity and inclusion in addition to PRSA’s national defined role. After some brainstorming, we quickly realized….ONE STATEMENT? That’s like trying to sum up 200+ resumes on one Post-it note. Rather than providing one local statement that represents our chapter, we decided to reach out to our members to gather their own thoughts directly about D&I and use it to enforce our policies more authentically. Because like true practice, we should always incorporate our members into the discussion.

We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.” – Max de Pree

Here’s a little glimpse of what’s to come: