PRSA January Newsletter

Take a look at PRSA Orlando’s January Newsletter.

Recap on what happened at the Best of #PRdiversity Twitter chat

by Alyssa Badalamenti, PRSA Diversity and Inclusion Chair

@PRSAOrlando, your chapter implemented a consistent diversity and inclusion blog that addresses timely topics, but also isn’t afraid to rid formality – share top lessons learned?

     PRSA Orlando: We heard feedback from our members that it was refreshing to hear our chapter address #PRdiversity topics in a casual way – just like we were talking at lunch — rather than a formal “by the book” approach. We learned that being direct in addressing #PRdiversity topics allowed opportunity for more focused discussion with our members. This inspired us to create a new event called Dinner, Diversity & Dialogue to continue those conversations.

Making diversity and inclusion part of the business strategy should be a top priority for all @PRSA @PRSSANational chapters for #PRdiversity to be effective. @PRSAOrlando, last calendar year, your chapter reinstated a Diversity & Inclusion Chair, one you hadn’t had for some time – what led to the reinstatement & what are lessons learned?

     PRSA Orlando: Orlando has always been a melting pot, especially because of our welcoming tourism. When the Pulse nightclub tragedy occurred in 2016, all of us in the Orlando community become a voice to remind each other and others how Orlando is proud to be diverse and inclusive. As Orlando strongly united as #OnePulse, the PRSA Orlando chapter BOD unanimously approved the re-establishment of a D&I Chair. #PRdiversity has become a focus for all members of the board – and something we expect to build on indefinitely.

You’ve been named an award-winning @PRSA chapter in 2018 for #PRdiversity – what are you most proud of looking back at the year when it comes to championing diversity & inclusion in our practice?

     PRSA Orlando: We are most proud of our members. We have given our members more of a voice through our initiatives, and are still learning and identifying approaches to be more effective. Check out some of our member quotes on what #PRdiversity means to them: https://prsaorlando.org/diversity-inclusion/

Following up on the last question, looking ahead to 2019, what are your plans/goals for #PRdiversity within your chapter?  Or in general for @PRSA @PRSSANational?

     PRSA Orlando: We plan to take our findings from #PRdiversity discussions and programs to produce a white paper addressing what D&I looks like to our members. We also plan on partnering with other great associations to create some best practices for public relations professionals.

As we wrap up our final #PRdiversity Twitter Chat for 2018, we’ll ask for any closing thoughts from our guests?

     PRSA Orlando: Don’t be afraid to address what you consider as taboo – just TALK about it! Ask questions to learn, discuss to consider, and take action to create positive change. Thank you @PRSAdiversity for honoring us with an award for our chapter efforts in diversity and inclusion this year. We look forward to learning more from @PRSANational and other chapters to make a continuing impact.

Follow us at @PRSAOrlando and follow #PRdiversity and @PRSADiversity to read more.

PRSA December Newsletter

Take a look at PRSA Orlando’s December Newsletter.

PRSA Orlando: Professional Development Summit

by Monique Trevett, UCF student 

PRSA Orlando held its annual Professional Development Summit on November 30, 2018 at Rosen Shingle Creek. The event consisted of a keynote speaker and three breakout sessions that were lined up with enthusiastic panelists. 

The day started with a keynote address by Moira Vetter, who spoke about the importance of entrepreneurial storytelling. Her presentation highlighted the characteristics that set apart entrepreneurs from regular people and how many entrepreneurs have helped to shape the society we live in today. Many entrepreneurs aren’t communications savvy, so they need individuals in public relations to help tell and sell their story. A unique trait that sets entrepreneurs apart from others is their never-ending fighting spirit when facing failure head on. One of the best takeaways of the presentation was how non-entrepreneurs can use their PR skills to help an entrepreneur grow. Moira’s storytelling skills were masterful, as she was able to clearly paint the picture of her presentation in her words. Her presentation truly captured the audiences’ attention. 

After the keynote address, many of the attendees were able to break out into three different sessions. One of the sessions I found extremely helpful was the “Always in a Hurry” session. This session broke down the importance of proofing and editing in PR as well as in other areas of the workforce. One key takeaway was to always fact check pieces. Many writers misspell names, which are key components to stories. A person’s name is the sweetest sound they will ever hear, and messing that up will ruin a story no matter how insightful it may be. One of the things I used to do when writing was always inserting quotes. The panel taught me to keep facts out of quotes and that they should include something profound or personal about the person it’s attributed to. Another important point that was brought up is that people don’t speak the way things are written. In order to keep things personal, one has to get to know the person they’re writing about. 

The other breakout session I attended and found interesting was “Owning Your Content.”  The session was quite insightful and focused on the importance of style and persona when it comes to PR. One of the ice breakers during the session included a mock brand, where someone had to make up a brand and try to create its messaging. A great example used in the presentation was Wendy’s on Twitter. Wendy’s was highly successful in its sassy snaps back towards other fast food chains, and it got the people going. Many individuals related to Wendy’s because they were able to speak to the minds of what they were actually thinking.  Not only was it enlightening, it was also one of the best moves for Wendy’s. It took the company out of Wendy’s and made it a person. One thing about the session I learned is you have to be willing to take risks. Wendy’s had a 50/50 shot regarding whether or not the tactic would work, but the company was willing to place all its eggs in one basket and was willing to try new things.

As a junior in college, I found the presentation to be very inspiring. I may not be majoring in public relations, but as a mass communications student, it was very helpful. Not only do I feel more educated on the matter, I feel more confident I will be able to utilize what I learned from the experience in any job field. 

 

PRSA Gives Back

Take a look at how you can give back with your fellow members of PRSA Orlando.

PRSA November Newsletter

Take a look at PRSA Orlando’s November Newsletter.

Key Takeaways from the 2018 PRSA International Conference

by Lauren Leetun, APR (pictured third from the left)

Many people associate Austin with “keeping it weird,” and while I did happen to come across one or two locals who were a little different, the vibe at the PRSA 2018 International Conference was anything but weird. In fact, if I had to sum it up in one word, it would be inspiring. I must thank the Orlando chapter for providing me with a scholarship to attend. As an independent practitioner, expenses surrounding a conference of this scope and magnitude can sometimes feel a bit out of reach. But thanks to the scholarship, I was able to see and hear from some of the most interesting public relations and marketing minds around the globe. Leaving ICON, I felt energized and ready to take on new challenges for my current and future clients.

One of the recurring themes among keynote speakers at the conference was how much of a difference public relations professional can – and should – make during a time when many audiences feel more divided than ever. Perhaps Former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich put it best when he said: “You have a great deal of influence over the tone of our national communications. You have a great deal of influence over your clients in terms of helping them to understand that civility- and by that, I mean just merely being respectful – is critically important and is good for them as well as for the country.”

The overarching theme of this year’s conference was communications convergence, and it’s a concept I’m sure most of us grapple with from time to time. What really constitutes a journalist nowadays? What is considered real news and what isn’t? I can tell you that there were several encouraging statements I heard from those in PRSA leadership at the national level that made me feel well-represented and defended. There are people in some of the highest positions of our organization that are consistently going to bat for PR professionals who may feel embattled or tired of having to fight against the notion that we provide ‘fake’ news on behalf of our clients. I was also encouraged to hear that leadership is turning its attention to the value that PRSA’s sections provide members; as a section leader myself, I have witnessed first-hand how important it can be to meet – even if it is virtually – with others who are in similar roles to brainstorm ideas, discuss hurdles, and even partner from time to time.

One of the most exciting pieces of news I heard during the conference was that ICON will be held in beautiful, sunny climates for at least the next two years. San Diego is next up in 2019, and, believe it or not… ORLANDO is slated to play host in 2020. As you well know, a lot can happen in any given profession in two years’ time, and given our current political climate and the fact that Orlando’s 2020 ICON will be held right before a presidential election, I think we’ve got a great opportunity to showcase just how critical public relations professionals are when it comes to leading both a national, and international, narrative.

Leaving Austin, I was grateful for the opportunity to reconnect with some old friends and to meet some new ones, and I was especially appreciative of the opportunity to learn from some of the best and brightest in this business. I’m excited to put what I learned into action in the weeks and months ahead, and look forward to what I’ll most certainly learn in San Diego, Orlando, and beyond.

Thank you again, PRSA Orlando, for the scholarship and for the opportunity to represent our great chapter in another really great city.

PRSA October Newsletter

Take a look at PRSA Orlando’s October Newsletter.

Effectively reach key messages to audiences of all ages in a multimedia generation

By Alyssa Badalamenti, PRSA Diversity and Inclusion Chair

By now, everyone has replaced ‘millennials’ with ‘Gen X’ in their editorials, and millennials are looped in with the previous generations who grew into having negative stereotypes of the newest generation. Why is it that with every generation we get into this cycle of comparing habits and perceiving them to be negative? Why does it have to be this way? Often, I hear it’s because “they don’t understand.” As communicators, it’s our job to understand our audience, but how can we communicate properly if we don’t shape our messages for a diverse audience? Rather than writing the same way we always have because it makes sense to us, we could instead seek input from generations outside our own. How we work, communicate, and consume is different among generations. By understanding why we have differences and what they are, we can communicate more effectively to our audiences.

Take a look at this chart taken from Dr. Susan MacManus’ editorial column, “Shining the Spotlight on Florida’s Youngest Registered Voters: A Generational Approach.” In her column, Dr. MacManus writes, “Each generation is different demographically and in its exposure to various major economic, social, technological, and political events that can impact vote decisions.” Each generation has had its own shaped opinions based on major life events and the presidential office held. Each life event also holds different weight in terms of importance. Add on differences in race, gender, religion, etc…it’s no wonder why we often hear that “they just don’t understand.”

Jennifer J. Deal, a research scientist with the Center for Creative Leadership, argues that the generations now of working age value essentially the same things as older generations.  “The so-called generation gap is, in large part, the result of miscommunication and misunderstanding, fueled by common insecurities and the desire for clout,” she says.  It’s easy to understand that each generation has had different experiences and thus probably has a unique perspective to communications and how they represent their work and their organizations. And naturally through the growth of resources, technology and transparency, public relations is going through its own generational growth. However, public relations has essentially stayed the same in its core values and foundation of key messages. Public relations practitioners in any generation could benefit by understanding generational differences and seeing the value in working as part of a multigenerational team. We just need to ask the right questions.

By working with multigenerational teams, we can more effectively communicate by seeking input on how key messages come across to different generations.  According to the Pew Research Center, there was a drop in media viewership from the last calendar year across most modes (newspaper, cable/network/local television, and digital-native news), with the exception of radio and social media. Communicators have always needed to be aware of how their audiences consume media and adapt to the changing trends; this is true for any generation.  Communicators can be successful by understanding how each generation consumes media, and by using a variety of communication types to reach their target audience. Example: “Check it out” versus “You may find the video below;” It’s especially important for internal communicators when talking to employees of diverse age groups. Communicators would benefit from studying and/or talking to generations different than their own to ensure key messages reflect the audiences being communicated to. Just remember, one way of communication is not better than the other; they’re just different approaches to relaying the same key message to an audience that understands it better.

Did you know? Maintain Your Accreditation By Writing a PRSA Orlando Blog Post

Every three years, accredited professionals must maintain their credential and commitment to the sound and ethical practice of public relations. One of the ways you can reach your maintenance goals is by publishing on the topic of public relations, including a blog post on our PRSA Orlando website.

APRs will receive 2 points for each well-thought article, op-ed, book review, blog post, podcast, or video published in a public relations journal, magazine, newspaper, newsletter, in print or electronic format.

Learn more here on how to maintain your accreditation. http://www.praccreditation.org/maintain/