Posts

PRSA August Newsletter

Easy, breezy value for new members

by Beth Swanson, Co-VP Membership Recruitment

We’ve got a hot offer for new members – use promo code SUMMER18* on your membership application before August 31 and receive a $25 Amazon gift card and waived initiation fee ($65).

For less than $300/year you can connect with colleagues in PR, marketing and communications for advice and fun.  Here are some of PRSA’s career-advancing benefits:

  • 24/7 access to the members-only MyPRSA online community. Share insights and ask questions of your fellow PR and communications professionals while elevating your thought leadership profile.
  • Member discount program for a wide variety of goods and services.
  • Discounted registration to a wealth of training programs and webinars.
  • The PRSA Membership App gives members access to the latest PRSA publications, including Issues & Trends, top-rated webinars, PRSA’s online community and membership directory.
  • PRSA Jobcenter
  • Opportunities to network with more than 21,000 communication and public relations professionals.
  • Subscription to the NEW industry-specific publication, PRSA Strategies & Tactics.

Summer is a perfect time to relax and reconnect with Central Florida colleagues. So take advantage and join today!

Have questions? Check out these links or email Beth Swanson, Co-VP Membership Recruitment

Membership Application

Why Join PRSA?

Member Benefits

*Offer is valid for persons joining at the Member and Associate Member 3 levels. Not valid for current members, renewing members, PRSSA Graduates, Graduate Students, Associate Members at levels 1 or 2. Refer to https://www.prsa.org/membership/membership-categories  for details.

Diversity Should Be Celebrated All Year Long

By Alyssa Badalamenti, Diversity & Inclusion Chair

June 12 marked two years since the Pulse nightclub tragedy in Orlando. 49 beautiful lives were taken senselessly. Through the heartbreak, our city has since become more unified in its strong voice for diversity and inclusion because of who we are and who we represent. But when remembering this tragic incident and many others along the way, it’s hard not to be reminded of how much hate still exists in the world.

“Ultimately, America’s answer to the intolerant man is diversity.” – Robert Kennedy

That being said, while we can’t raise a magic wand this minute, we can do our part to build a greater immunity to hate and be more representative of diversity by deliberately being inclusive within our companies, our associations, and our own daily lives.

Just check out this list of 26 companies who celebrate diversity all year long. These companies are LIVING their differences, not just preaching it. Embracing all types of people, ridding the norms, and seeing a good person as a good person are what help shape D&I for all members of society.

“Our ability to reach unity in diversity will be the beauty and test of our civilization.” – Mahatma Gandhi

Recently our PRSA Orlando chapter board of directors decided we wanted to make a statement to our members that reflects our chapter on diversity and inclusion in addition to PRSA’s national defined role. After some brainstorming, we quickly realized….ONE STATEMENT? That’s like trying to sum up 200+ resumes on one Post-it note. Rather than providing one local statement that represents our chapter, we decided to reach out to our members to gather their own thoughts directly about D&I and use it to enforce our policies more authentically. Because like true practice, we should always incorporate our members into the discussion.

We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.” – Max de Pree

Here’s a little glimpse of what’s to come:

2018 PRSA Membership Savings

by Beth Swanson, MBA & APR

Taking time from our busy schedules to refresh and renew with peers opens us to new ideas, advice and problem-solving assistance, according to Francesca Gino, a professor at Harvard Business School in a recent article on HBR.org.

During my 13 years as a member and volunteer, PRSA has provided me with just that through opportunities to meet communicators in my field and the industries where I’ve worked. These professional relationships are both fulfilling and enlightening and have made me a believer in the link between networking and career success. That’s why I encourage professionals in PR, marketing, and communications to join us.

This year PRSA is making it even easier to share the benefits of our chapter and national organization with several 2018 promotions that welcome new and returning members to PRSA.

Score a thank you gift and help a colleague save on membership dues during the Refer-A-Friend promotion. Members receive a $40 Amazon gift card for each new person who joins PRSA and lists your name as a referral on the application form (How did you hear about PRSA). PRSA will also waive your friend’s $65 initiation fee if they use the promo code FRIENDS18Applies to Member (3+ years experience) and Associate Member 3 (2-3 years experience) levels only.

Know a lapsed PRSA member? Let them know former members can use the promo code WELCOMEBACK18 and PRSA will waive their $35 reinstatement fee. Applies to memberships lapsed 6 or more months. 

Anyone applying as a new member can use the promo code JOINPRSA18 and the $65 initiation fee will be waived.  Applies to Member (3+ years experience) and Associate Member 3 (2-3 years experience) levels only.

All promotions are valid through Dec 31, 2018.  Learn more about PRSA membership benefits, chapters, and professional interest communities at https://www.prsa.org/membership/.

Have questions?  Please email Beth Swanson, Co-VP Membership Recruitment at beth@swansoncomm.com.

How Nonverbal Communication Speaks Loudly Through Diversity

By Alyssa Badalamenti, Diversity & Inclusion Chair

Over the holidays I traveled to three different countries – all of which I didn’t speak the native language, but learned a few key phrases to help me communicate throughout the day.

What I quickly realized, though, was even though I could speak “enough,” the language didn’t actually help me as significantly as I thought it would. Instead, while trying to speak my message, there were follow up questions I couldn’t understand. So, without even thinking, my reaction was to respond with my hands and animate nonverbal cues to communicate more fully. In turn, the others responded the same way, and we actually had a short conversation that came to the point naturally, and without even speaking to each other.

This nonverbal communication helped me through three language barriers, so much that I didn’t feel like I was at a disadvantage not knowing the native tongue. It’s amazing how through simply using your hands and expressing emotion through your face to set the tone spoke more loudly than “il conto per favore,” which plainly means, “may you please bring the bill?” I added in nonverbal signs for how the food was great and that we were pleased and ready to go.

Of course, there are cultural differences among nations that prove some nonverbal behaviors vary in their message, but for this example let’s put that aside and instead focus on the fact that those of different nations are still human beings. Good communication carries strongly all over the world.

In 79 AD, on the southwest coast of Italy, the extremely dangerous volcano, Mount Vesuvius, explosively erupted over the city of Pompeii. All those residing there died instantly of thermal shock. Back then (and for thousands of years), settlements painted and drew pictures on the walls of their city and homes to depict expression. Even though we lost the chance to learn about the people of Pompeii through written language, we’ve learned about them through their paintings. When viewing just one, we see a narrative and several learnings of how they lived. These stories are told without words, yet we can interpret the message of what they mean just by focusing on the details of the painting. Pretty remarkable.

So what does this mean to me—to you? This is more than the lesson of “nonverbal communication is still communication.” This trip and these type of experiences actually instead remind me to not overthink things when working in communications among different audiences. Simple pictorial or nonverbal communications speak loudly. Getting to the point is the most important part, and be aware of facial expressions that set the tone of your messages. Nonverbal signals speak loudly to those of all backgrounds, so never underestimate your ability to communicate effectively and authentically to those who are different than you.